Tag Archive | "usgs"

Two HVO geologists document road cutting activities on HWY 132 on August 7, 2019. One geologist is taking visual photographs while another geologist is taking thermal photographs to make a tandem pair for comparison. The temperature of the solidified lava was measured to 425° C (800° F) at the digging site. Photograph by USGS geologist K. Mulliken.

Volcano Watch: Why is the 2018 lava still so hot?

As roads are recut into Kīlauea’s 2018 lava flow field, many have been surprised at how hot the lava remains under the surface, even though it is solidified.

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Sulphur Cone (left), viewed toward southwest, from 3,480 m (11,420 ft) above sea level on Mauna Loa’s southwest rift zone. At right, an HVO geoscientist and technician rebuild volcanic gas monitoring equipment installed near an outgassing fissure.

Volcano Watch: High Altitude Station Maintenance on Mauna Loa

The Sulphur Cone area stands out in bright contrast. It’s a steaming section of the 1950 eruptive fissure at 11,420 ft elevation.

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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for October 24, 2019

The water pond at the bottom of Halema‘uma‘u continues to slowly expand and deepen.

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This image is from a temporary monitoring camera on the west rim of Kilauea Caldera. The camera is looking E towards the bottom of the newly enlarged Halemaʻumaʻu crater. The crater from left to right (roughly NNE to SSW) is approximately 1 km (0.6 mi) across. The depth of the crater in the visible image from the rim is several hundred meters.

Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for October 17, 2019

Hazards remain at the Lower East Rift Zone and summit of Kīlauea. Closures and warnings in these areas should be heeded.

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About 1300 earthquakes with magnitudes greater than 1 and at depths over 20 km (12 mi) on and around the Island of Hawaiʻi since August 2019 are depicted on this map. Most of the earthquakes were clustered beneath the southern edge of the island near the town of Pāhala. Blue and purple dots indicate earthquakes at 20-40 km (12-25 mi) and more than 40 km (25 mi) depths, respectively. USGS map by B. Shiro.

Volcano Watch: Why do so many deep earthquakes happen around Pāhala?

About 1300 earthquakes with magnitudes greater than 1 and at depths over 20 km (12 mi) on and around the Island of Hawaiʻi since August 2019.

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Halemaumau water lake. USGS/HVO Photo

Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for October 10, 2019

Kῑlauea Volcano is not erupting and its USGS Volcano Alert level remains at normal.

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Volcano Watch: Geologic history of Mauna Loa’s southeast flank revealed in new map

The recently published “Geologic map of the central-southeast flank of Mauna Loa volcano” is the culmination of years of fieldwork by the U.S. Geological Survey.

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This image is from a temporary monitoring camera on the west rim of Kilauea Caldera. The camera is looking E towards the bottom of the newly enlarged Halemaʻumaʻu crater. The crater from left to right (roughly NNE to SSW) is approximately 1 km (0.6 mi) across. The depth of the crater in the visible image from the rim is several hundred meters. Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO

Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for October 3, 2019

Kῑlauea Volcano is not erupting and its USGS Volcano Alert level remains at NORMAL.

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A USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientist, while assisting Alaska Volcano Observatory colleagues this summer, mounted a radio antenna on an upgraded seismic station at Great Sitkin Volcano in the western Aleutian Islands. USGS photo by A. Darold, 06-20-2019.

Volcano Watch: HVO staff lend a helping hand to Alaska colleagues

Volcano observatories across the United States work together to ensure efficient and thorough monitoring of the nation’s active volcanoes.

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This image is from a temporary monitoring camera on the west rim of Kilauea Caldera. The camera is looking E towards the bottom of the newly enlarged Halemaʻumaʻu crater. The crater from left to right (roughly NNE to SSW) is approximately 1 km (0.6 mi) across. The depth of the crater in the visible image from the rim is several hundred meters.

Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for September 19, 2019

Kῑlauea Volcano is not erupting and its USGS Volcano Alert level remains at NORMAL

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Day-to-day changes in the water level at the bottom of Halema‘uma‘u are subtle and impossible to accurately measure. But when comparing views of the pond over several days some differences can be seen, as shown in these images. Rocks that were visible in the water on September 2 could no longer be seen today (September 5). Note particularly that two rocks protruding above the water at the top of the September 2 photo are now submerged—evidence that the pond continues to slowly rise. USGS photos by D. Swanson.

Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for September 5, 2019

Kῑlauea Volcano is not erupting and its USGS Volcano Alert level remains at NORMAL. Reflecting this level, HVO is now issuing monthly updates for Kīlauea.

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Volcano Watch: “Volcano Watch” receives national award

“Volcano Watch” was awarded First Place in the Electronic Publication category by the National Association of Government Communicators.

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Ash rises above Halemaʻumaʻu within Kīlauea’s summit caldera in this May 27, 2018, telephoto image from near Volcano House Hotel in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. By the time Kīlauea’s summit collapse events ended on August 2, Halema‘uma‘u was 2.5 km (1.5 mi) wide and 500 m (1600 ft) deep; prior to the 2018 collapses, it was about 1 km (0.5 mi) wide and 85 m (about 280 ft) deep. A segment of a long-closed Park trail is visible winding across the caldera floor (lower left). USGS photo by K. Anderson.  

Volcano Watch: New insights gained from Kīlauea Volcano’s 2018 summit collapses

A year ago, USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists and Island of Hawaiʻi residents were in the throes of an historically unprecedented series of events for Kīlauea.

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Scientists use a laser diffraction particle size analyzer to examine fine ash from the 2018 Kīlauea summit explosions. The research examines fine ash (grains 1 mm to 1 micrometer) and investigates the processes of eruption, fragmentation, and respiratory health hazards (PM10, PM2.5). USGS image by A. Van Eaton

Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for May 9, 2019

Scientists use a laser diffraction particle size analyzer to examine fine ash from the 2018 Kīlauea summit explosions.

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