Tag Archive | "thomas jaggar"

Thomas Jaggar and his wife, Isabel, hiking on Mauna Loa during the September 1919 Southwest Rift Zone eruption. USGS archive photo.

Volcano Watch: Jaggar achieves significant science in HVO’s first year but at great personal cost

After years of fund-raising, Thomas Jaggar, Jr., finally got the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) up and running at Kilauea Volcano in January 1912. Sadly, Jaggar’s private life didn’t fare well during his first year at Kilauea.

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Thomas-Jagger-Halemaumau-t

Volcano Watch: How it all began–the first steps toward volcano monitoring in the United States

Thomas Jaggar stepped off the steamer “Mauna Kea” in Hilo on Wednesday morning, January 17, 1912, and, by noon, was at the Volcano House hotel on the northeast rim of Kilauea Caldera.

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One hundred years ago, Frank Perret, world-famous volcanologist, was watching the lava lake action in Halemaumau Crater. Honolulu businessmen and scientists impressed by his observations met to discuss how to continue them and to make a permanent observatory at Kilauea’s summit a reality.

Volcano Watch: How Thomas Jaggar’s vision became the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

One hundred years ago, Frank Perret, world-famous volcanologist, was watching the lava lake action in Halemaumau Crater. Honolulu businessmen and scientists impressed by his observations met to discuss how to continue them and to make a permanent observatory at Kilauea’s summit a reality.

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… some time between July 2, 1911 (Perret’s arrival) and July 1, 1912 (Jaggar’s first paycheck)

Volcano Watch: The Founding of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

… some time between July 2, 1911 (Perret’s arrival) and July 1, 1912 (Jaggar’s first paycheck)

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Volcano Watch: Rise and fall of summit lava lakes

Volcano Watch: Rise and fall of summit lava lakes

(Volcano Watch is a weekly article written by scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.) In May 1922, the scene at Halemaumau Crater in Kilauea Caldera was spectacular. The level of lava within the crater had been rising since November 1921. Six months later, upwelling lava and fountains from up to 20 different […]

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Kauahikaua to lecture on pioneer Perret (Jan. 25)

Kauahikaua to lecture on pioneer Perret (Jan. 25)

MEDIA RELEASE Scientist-in-Charge Jim Kauahikaua of the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory will tell the story of volcanologist Frank Perret and how his early observations of Kilauea’s lava lakes and fountains are relevant to today’s summit eruption. The program begins at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 25 in the Kilauea Visitor Center auditorium. Fresh from volcanic eruptions […]

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Volcano Watch: Kilauea has been erupting for a long, long time

Volcano Watch: Kilauea has been erupting for a long, long time

(Volcano Watch is a weekly article written by scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.) On May 21, 2010, Kilauea Volcano’s ongoing eruption reaches a milestone: 10,000 days! The eruption began Jan. 3, 1983, when a series of fissures roared to life on Kilauea’s east rift zone. As the eruption progressed, it eventually […]

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April 2010 marks the 70th anniversary of Mauna Loa’s third longest summit eruption in recorded history. The 134-day-long eruption in 1940 has been exceeded in duration only by summit eruptions in 1873–74 and in 1949, which lasted 560 days and 147 days, respectively.

Volcano Watch: Momentous year for Mauna Loa, Thomas Jaggar

April 2010 marks the 70th anniversary of Mauna Loa’s third longest summit eruption in recorded history. The 134-day-long eruption in 1940 has been exceeded in duration only by summit eruptions in 1873–74 and in 1949, which lasted 560 days and 147 days, respectively.

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