Tag Archive | "hawaiian volcano observatory"

Volcano Watch: Hualalai is third most active volcano in Hawaii

Volcano Watch: Hualalai is third most active volcano in Hawaii

(Volcano Watch is a weekly article written by scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.) The West Hawaii Today issue for September 11, 2009, contained a letter to the editor titled “Hualalai is a real and present threat.” The writer’s main point was that “Hualalai is the ‘secret in the closet’ that nobody […]

Read the full story

Posted in Sci-TechComments (0)

Kauahikaua shares volcano research

Kauahikaua shares volcano research

MEDIA RELEASE  Speaker for the next Puana Ka Ike Lecture is ‘Volcano Jim’ – Dr. James P. Kauahikaua, scientist-in-charge at Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. Kauahikaua will speak on volcanology, geology, and moolelo: * KONA: 5:30-7 p.m., Friday, Sept. 25, Keauhou Beach Resort, Ballroom III  * HILO: noon-1:30 p.m., Monday, Sept. 28, UH-Hilo (Eia Hawaii), University Classroom […]

Read the full story

Posted in Sci-TechComments (0)

Volcano Watch: Putting Kilauea’s current activity in perspective

Volcano Watch: Putting Kilauea’s current activity in perspective

  (Volcano Watch is a weekly article written by scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.) Dr. Thomas L. Wright, former scientist-in-charge of HVO, spent the last two weeks in Hawaii exchanging ideas and information with HVO scientists.   “We’re witnessing a unique time in Kilauea’s history,” Tom says, and he should know. […]

Read the full story

Posted in Sci-TechComments (0)

Stimulus money earmarked to update HVO

Stimulus money earmarked to update HVO

MEDIA RELEASE Residents and critical infrastructure in the nation’s six highest-risk volcanic areas – including Hawaii – will benefit from increased monitoring and analysis as a result of Recovery Act funds being channeled into volcano monitoring. The U.S. Geological Survey is planning to use $15.2 million of its American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds to […]

Read the full story

Posted in Sci-TechComments (0)

Volcano Watch: Kilauea's 1952 summit eruption

Volcano Watch: Kilauea’s 1952 summit eruption

  (Volcano Watch is a weekly article written by scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.) About 20 minutes before midnight on June 27, 1952, almost exactly 57 years ago, Mrs. John Fox walked from the living room of her home on the east rim of Kilauea caldera into an adjoining room.  She […]

Read the full story

Posted in Sci-TechComments (0)

HVO's five Webcams now easier to access through central site. Menu includes summit caldera, vent, rift zone, crater.

Volcano Watch: New Webcam menu makes lava views safely available

HVO’s five Webcams now easier to access through central site. Menu includes summit caldera, vent, rift zone, crater.

Read the full story

Posted in Featured, Sci-TechComments (1)

Volcano watch: Magma within Kilauea’s summit vent never goes flat

Volcano watch: Magma within Kilauea’s summit vent never goes flat

(Volcano Watch is a weekly article written by scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.) Two weeks ago, readers of this column learned about the genesis of brown plumes and sudden gas release from Kilauea’s summit vent.  This week we will continue that exploration, looking farther into Kilauea’s magma plumbing system to explain […]

Read the full story

Posted in Sci-TechComments (0)

Rumbling sounds from summit preceded the second longest summit eruption since 1874. The eruption drew a squadron of sight-seeing planes and hundreds of spectators.

Volcano Watch: Mauna Loa’s 1949 summit eruption

Rumbling sounds from summit preceded the second longest summit eruption since 1874. The eruption drew a squadron of sight-seeing planes and hundreds of spectators.

Read the full story

Posted in Featured, Sci-TechComments (0)

Volcano Watch: What’s white and wet and green all over?

Volcano Watch: Volcanic, man-made pollution cause similar effects

Volcano Watch: What’s white and wet and green all over?

Read the full story

Posted in Featured, Sci-TechComments (0)

 

Quantcast