Archive | Featured

Sediment runoff enters Pelekāne Bay following a wildfire and flash flooding in 2015. Overgrazing by feral ungulates and cattle are the most significant contributors to erosion, which can be exacerbated by heavy rainfall and wildfires. Photo courtesy Andrew Richard Hara.

Efforts underway to improve Pelekāne Bay water quality

The primary purpose of the project is to protect and improve the quality of water resources and reduce pollution flowing into Pelekāne Bay

Read the full story

Posted in Environment, Featured0 Comments

The causes of Rapid Ohia Death. USGS image

Keeping hooved animals out of Ohia forests reduces the spread of Rapid Ohia Death

Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death, or ROD for short, enters trees through wounds to its bark.

Read the full story

Posted in Agriculture, Education, Environment, Featured, News, Ranching0 Comments

Senator Mazie K. Hirono questions Interior Secretary Nominee David Bernhardt about the future home of Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

Senator Hirono questions decision to relocate Hawaiian Volcano Observatory to Oahu

Moving Hawaiian Volcano Observatory to Oahu “Doesn’t Seem to Make a Lot of Sense”

Read the full story

Posted in Featured, Government, News, Sci-Tech, Volcano3 Comments

This image is from a temporary monitoring camera on the west rim of Kilauea Caldera. The camera is looking East towards the bottom of the newly enlarged Halemaʻumaʻu crater, although the deepest part of the crater is not visible from this vantage point. The crater from left to right (roughly NNE to SSW) is approximately 1 km (0.6 mi) across. The depth of the crater in the visible image from the rim is several hundred meters. Image courtesy of USGS/HVO Webcam

Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for March 28, 2019

Kīlauea is not erupting. Rates of seismicity, deformation, and gas release have not changed significantly over the past week.

Read the full story

Posted in Featured, Sci-Tech, Volcano0 Comments

This aerial view of the western part of Kīlauea Volcano’s caldera was taken on August 6, 2018. The down-dropped block is faulted about 120 m (400 feet) below the caldera floor. Many 19th-century lava flows are exposed in the fault scarps. Halema‘uma‘u (not visible) is to the left of this photo. USGS photo by D.Swanson.

Volcano Watch: New outcrops make good geology

As Halemaʻumaʻu sank and widened, its crater wall began to expose lava flows that formed during earlier eruptions and were covered by later flows.

Read the full story

Posted in Featured, Sci-Tech, Volcano0 Comments

Summer Space & Science Camp for Hawaii High School Girls

Applications open for 2019 STARS Program on Hawaii Island

Summer Space & Science Camp for Hawaii High School Girls

Read the full story

Posted in Astronomy, Education, Featured, Sci-Tech0 Comments

Hawaii Tracker FB Page-t

Big Island Press Club bestows ‘Excellence in Media Innovation Award’ to Hawaii Tracker Facebook group

The Big Island Press Club is awards its inaugural Excellence in Media Innovation award to the Hawaii Tracker Facebook Group.

Read the full story

Posted in Education, Entertainment, Featured, News, Sci-Tech, Volcano0 Comments

Carving Ki‘i. Photo by James K. Kaulukukui Jr.

National Park Week & April 2019 Events at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture, After Dark in the Park talks, and stewardship programs in April.

Read the full story

Posted in Education, Entertainment, Featured0 Comments

Explosive eruption columns of ash rising from Halema‘uma‘u at 11:15 a.m. on May 18, 1924 (left) and at 11:05 a.m. on May 15, 2018 (right) look similar. Researchers are re-evaluating early assumptions about the role groundwater played in triggering these explosive eruptions at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano and are now looking at the build-up of gases from retreating magma as a likely trigger. USGS photos.

Volcano Watch: Did groundwater trigger explosive eruptions at Kīlauea?

An explosive eruption at Halema‘uma‘u in 1924 looks similar to the column of ash rising from Halema‘uma‘u in 2018.

Read the full story

Posted in Featured, Sci-Tech, Volcano0 Comments

After magma drained from Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō on April 30, 2018, the crater was roughly 356 m (1168 ft) deep, with the upper part of the crater flared and the deeper part a narrower cylindrical shaft. Collapses on the crater walls have since enlarged sections of the crater and filled the deepest part with rockfall debris, creating a much different crater geometry—as shown in this comparison of models from May 11, 2018, and March 18, 2019. Today, the deepest portion of the crater is 286 m (938 ft).

Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for March 22, 2019

Kīlauea is not erupting. Rates of seismicity, deformation, and gas release have not changed significantly over the past week.

Read the full story

Posted in Featured, Gallery, Sci-Tech, Videos, Volcano0 Comments

Map of selected earthquakes beneath a portion of southeast Hawai`i from May 4, 2018 to March 14, 2019, showing principally aftershocks following May 4, 2018 M6.9 earthquake. Black dots indicate epicenters of 13,083 earthquakes located during this time interval; yellow stars show locations of the M6.9 earthquake and the March 13, 2019 M5.5 earthquake. Data source: U S Geological Survey, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

Volcano Watch: Magnitude 5.5 earthquake – a bump in the night toward a mo​re typical seismic background

This is the same fault that was responsible for last May’s M6.9 earthquake.

Read the full story

Posted in Earthquake, Featured, Sci-Tech, Volcano0 Comments

0046609B-9FE8-4727-9B15-A4975151D3C0

Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for March 15, 2019

Kīlauea is not erupting. Rates of seismicity, deformation, and gas release have not changed significantly over the past week.

Read the full story

Posted in Featured, Gallery, Sci-Tech, Videos, Volcano0 Comments

Epicenter of the early morning Wednesday, March 13, 2019 earthquake.

Early morning 5.5 magnitude quake strikes Hawaii Island, no tsunami threat Wednesday (March 13)

A 5.5 magnitude earthquake occurred on Kilauea Volcano at 12:55 a.m. Wednesday, March 13, 2019. No tsunami is expected from this quake. According to the USGS ‘Did you feel it?’ website the quake was felt throughout Hawaii Island.

Read the full story

Posted in Earthquake, Featured, News0 Comments

Motorists will need to remove their vehicles by 10 p.m. on, Tuesday March 12, 2019 due to construction work at the exit lanes.

Vehicles parked at Hilo airport will be trapped overnight Tuesday (March 12)

The two exit lanes leading out of the parking lot will be closed at about 10 p.m. on Tuesday, Mar. 12, 2019, and will reopen at 4 a.m. on Wednesday, Mar. 13, 2019 due to construction work.

Read the full story

Posted in Featured, News0 Comments

 

 

Become a fan on facebook

 

 

Quantcast