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Hurricane Douglas continues towards Hawaii

Watches and warnings in effect as of 11 p.m. HST Saturday (July 25).

See the Central Pacific Hurricane Center information on Douglas here.

A Hurricane Warning is in effect for…

  • Oahu
  • Kauai County, including the islands of Kauai and Niihau

A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for…

  • Hawaii County
  • Maui County, including the islands of Maui, Lanai, Molokai and Kahoolawe

A Hurricane Watch is in effect for…

  • Hawaii County
  • Maui County, including the islands of Maui, Lanai, Molokai and Kahoolawe

A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for…

  • Portions of the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument from Nihoa to French Frigate Shoals.

A Hurricane Warning means that hurricane conditions are expected somewhere within the warning area within 36 hours.

A Tropical Storm Warning means that tropical storm conditions are expected somewhere within the warning area, in this case within 24 to 36 hours.

A Hurricane Watch means that hurricane conditions are possible within the watch area, in this case within the next 12 to 24 hours.

A Tropical Storm Watch means that tropical storm conditions are possible within the watch area within the next 48 hours.

Interests elsewhere in the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument should monitor the progress of this system. For storm information specific to your area, please monitor products issued by the National Weather Service office in Honolulu Hawaii.

DISCUSSION AND OUTLOOK

At 11 p.m. HST (0900 UTC), the center of Hurricane Douglas was located by reconnaissance aircraft near latitude 20.4 North, longitude 152.8 West. Douglas is moving toward the west-northwest near 16 mph (26 km/h), and this general motion is expected to continue for the next couple of days. On the forecast track, Douglas will pass dangerously close to the main Hawaiian Islands on Sunday.

Maximum sustained winds are near 90 mph (150 km/h) with higher gusts. Some slow weakening is forecast during the next 48 hours, but Douglas is forecast to remain near hurricane intensity as it passes the islands, necessitating a Hurricane Warning for Kauai County.

Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 25 miles (35 km) from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 105 miles (165 km).

HAZARDS AFFECTING LAND

WIND: Hurricane conditions are expected on Oahu on Sunday and are possible across Maui County and the Big Island on Sunday.

Tropical Storm conditions are expected across Hawaii County and Maui County beginning late tonight or Sunday and across Kauai County Sunday night.

The strong winds can send trees, branches, and other objects into roadways, power lines and/or equipment. Winds this strong can damage roofs and cause flying debris if outdoor items are not properly tied down. These winds can make driving difficult especially for high profile vehicles. The winds can also forcefully swing doors open or shut so use caution when opening or closing vehicle doors.

Hawaii Electric Light Company (HELCO) reminds people that if you see a downed power line you should stay as far away as possible and report any damage or outages to their dispatch center at (808) 969-6666.

SURF: Large swells generated by Douglas are expected to build tonight and affect the Hawaiian Islands Sunday into Monday, and a storm surge of 2 to 4 feet above normal tides is expected near the center of Douglas. The large swells and surge will produce life-threatening and potentially destructive surf along exposed shores.

RAINFALL: Heavy rainfall associated with Douglas is expected to affect portions of the main Hawaiian Islands from late tonight into Monday. Total rain accumulations of 5 to 10 inches are possible from Maui County westward to Kauai County, with the greatest amounts in elevated terrain. This rain may result in life-threatening flash flooding and landslides, as well as rapid water level rises on small streams. Douglas could produce 2 to 5 inches of rainfall over the northern half of the Big Island.

Campers and hikers should avoid low lying flood prone areas. People should stay away from streams, drainage ditches and low lying areas prone to flooding. The rainfall and runoff will cause hazardous driving conditions due to ponding, reduced visibility, and poor braking action. Excessive runoff may cause rockslides and mudslides in steep terrain. Remember, if lightning does threaten your area, the safest place to be is indoors.

Debris in streams and gulches may clog bridges and culverts resulting in flooding outside normal water channels causing damage.

Do not cross fast flowing or rising water in your vehicle or on foot. Turn around, don’t drown.

For links to the latest weather forecasts, reports, radar and satellite imagery visit our Weather Page at hawaii247.com/weather

NWS Infrared Satellite Image Loop

Actions to take when a tropical storm or hurricane nears Hawaii

All of Hawaii’s citizens should know what to do during a hurricane, tropical storm watches and warnings. Watches and warnings are prepared for the Hawaiian Islands by the National Weather Service Central Pacific Hurricane Center in Honolulu. When watches and warnings are issued, people should closely monitor the Internet, radio, TV, or NOAA Weather Radio for official bulletins of the storm’s progress and instructions from civil defense authorities. Jim Weyman, director of the Central Pacific Hurricane Center, said, “Although you and your family may have never experienced a hurricane, don’t be complacent! It’s not a matter of if a hurricane will occur, but when one will occur. All of the Hawaiian Islands are at risk for a hurricane and we should all know what actions to take.”

For the Central Pacific Ocean a Hurricane/Tropical Storm Watch means hurricane/tropical storm conditions are possible in the specified area of the Watch, usually within 48 hours.

When a Hurricane or Tropical Storm Watch is issued:

  • Fuel and service family vehicles.
  • Prepare to cover all windows and door openings with boards, shutters or other shielding materials.
  • Check food and water supplies. Have clean, air-tight containers on hand to store at least two weeks of drinking water (14 gallons per person), and stock up on canned provisions. Keep a small cooler with frozen gel packs handy for packing refrigerated items.
  • Check prescription medicines – obtain at least 10-14 day supply.
  • Stock up on extra batteries for radios, flashlights, and lanterns.
  • Store and secure outdoor lawn furniture and other loose, lightweight objects, such as garbage cans and garden tools.
  • Check and replenish first-aid supplies.
  • Have on hand an extra supply of cash.
  • Read the Hawaii Boater’s Hurricane and Tsunami Safety Manual for recommended precautions to protect your boat prior to a storm.

For the Central Pacific Ocean a Hurricane/Tropical Storm Warning means hurricane/tropical storm conditions are expected in the specified area of the Warning, usually within 36 hours.

When a Hurricane or Tropical Storm Warning is issued:

  • Follow instructions issued by civil defense. Leave immediately if ordered to do so.
  • Complete preparation activities, such as boarding up windows and storing loose objects.
  • Evacuate areas that might be affected by storm surge flooding. If evacuating, leave early.
  • Notify neighbors and a family member outside of the warned area of your evacuation plans.
  • Read the Hawaii Boater’s Hurricane and Tsunami Safety Manual for recommended precautions to protect your boat prior to a storm.

The Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) issues tropical cyclone warnings, watches, advisories, discussions, and statements for all tropical cyclones in the Central Pacific from 140 Degrees West Longitude to the International Dateline. The season officially begins on June 1 and ends on November 30. However, tropical cyclones can occur at any time. The National Weather Service Forecast Office in Honolulu activates the CPHC when: (1) a tropical cyclone moves into the Central Pacific from the Eastern Pacific, (2) a tropical cyclone forms in the Central Pacific, or (3) a tropical cyclone moves into the Central Pacific from the West.

NOAA Hurricane Preparedness

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