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On July 13, we posted an image of a tiny "island" forming just offshore of the Kapoho ocean entry. Today, that feature—likely a submarine tumulus of lava that built up underwater and emerged above sea level—is no longer an "island." It now looks more like a peninsula, attached to the coast by a black sand tombolo, a sandy isthmus, creating a feature known as a "tied island." Whether or not it will withstand wave erosion over time remains to be seen. Photo taken Thursday, August 2, 2018 courtesy of U.S. Geological Survey

On July 13, we posted an image of a tiny “island” forming just offshore of the Kapoho ocean entry. Today, that feature—likely a submarine tumulus of lava that built up underwater and emerged above sea level—is no longer an “island.” It now looks more like a peninsula, attached to the coast by a black sand tombolo, a sandy isthmus, creating a feature known as a “tied island.” Whether or not it will withstand wave erosion over time remains to be seen. Photo taken Thursday, August 2, 2018 courtesy of U.S. Geological Survey

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