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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for May 29, 2014


Time-lapse movie of Halemaumau Crater (5/23-29/14)


Thermal image movie of Halemaumau Crater (5/23-29/14)

(Activity updates are written by scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.)

A lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u produced nighttime glow that was visible via HVO’s Webcam during the past week. The lava lake level dropped during deflation that began on May 10 and remained relatively low for the next two weeks. Over the past week, the lava level rose with summit inflation. By May 29, the lava level had reached 43 m (140 ft) below the rim of the Overlook crater.

On Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone, the Kahauale‘a 2 flow remains active but has diminished greatly in vigor over the past two weeks. The flow front has stalled at 8.8 km (5.5 miles) northeast of its vent on Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō, with very weak surface flows active behind the flow front. Several small spatter cones within Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō crater continue to produce glow.

There were three earthquakes reported felt in the past week within the State of Hawaii. On May 25, 2014, at 5:32 a.m., HST, a magnitude-2.9 earthquake occurred 3 km (2 mi) southeast of Captain Cook at a depth of 7 km (5 mi). On May 28 at 4:40 p.m., a magnitude-3.8 earthquake occurred 68 km (42 mi) northeast of Kailua, O‘ahu, at a depth of 30 km (19 mi). On May 28 at 11:03 p.m., a magnitude-3.2 earthquake occurred 4.8 km north of Kawaihae at a depth of 23 km (15 mi).

Visit the HVO website (hvo.wr.usgs.gov) for past Volcano Awareness Month articles and current Kīlauea, Mauna Loa, and Hualālai activity updates, recent volcano photos, recent earthquakes, and more; call (808) 967-8862 for a Kīlauea summary; email questions to askHVO@usgs.gov


Kīlauea Caldera from HVO (5/23-29/14)

Map showing the Kahaualeʻa 2 flow in relation to the eastern part of the Island of Hawaiʻi as of May 30, 2014. Red stars mark active breakouts—the most distant was 6.2 km (3.9 miles) straight-line distance northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. Older lava flows are distinguished by color: episodes 1–48b flows (1983–1986) are shown in gray; episodes 48c–49 flows (1986–1992) are pale yellow; episodes 50–55 flows (1992–2007) are tan; episodes 58–60 flows (2007–2011) are pale orange, and episode 61 flows (2011–2013) are reddish orange. The active lava tube is shown with a yellow line (dashed where its position is poorly known).

Map showing the Kahaualeʻa 2 flow in relation to the eastern part of the Island of Hawaiʻi as of May 30, 2014. Red stars mark active breakouts—the most distant was 6.2 km (3.9 miles) straight-line distance northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. Older lava flows are distinguished by color: episodes 1–48b flows (1983–1986) are shown in gray; episodes 48c–49 flows (1986–1992) are pale yellow; episodes 50–55 flows (1992–2007) are tan; episodes 58–60 flows (2007–2011) are pale orange, and episode 61 flows (2011–2013) are reddish orange. The active lava tube is shown with a yellow line (dashed where its position is poorly known).


Multi-image movie of Pu’u ‘O’o Crater. (5/23/14-6/1/14)


Thermal image movie of Pu‘u ‘O‘o Crater (5/23/14-6/1/14)


Pu’u ‘O’o Crater East Flank. (5/23/14-6/1/14)

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