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Volcano Watch: Kilauea activity update for June 13, 2013

Two ocean entry points remain active near Kupapaʻu Point, near the boundary of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. The eastern entry has produced a larger plume than that at the western entry, which tends to be weak and wispy. On Tuesday (June 11) several small breakouts were active just inland of the eastern entry point, creating a narrow cascade of lava pouring down the sea cliff. Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO

Two ocean entry points remain active near Kupapaʻu Point, near the boundary of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. The eastern entry has produced a larger plume than that at the western entry, which tends to be weak and wispy. On Tuesday (June 11) several small breakouts were active just inland of the eastern entry point, creating a narrow cascade of lava pouring down the sea cliff. Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO

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Time-lapse movie of Halemaumau overlook vent

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Time-lapse thermal image movie of Halemaumau overlook vent

(Activity updates are written by scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.)

The summit eruption in Halemaʻumaʻu crater remains active on Tuesday (June 11). The lava lake is within the Overlook crater (the source of the gas plume), which is in the southeast portion of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater. Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO

The summit eruption in Halemaʻumaʻu crater remains active on Tuesday (June 11). The lava lake is within the Overlook crater (the source of the gas plume), which is in the southeast portion of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater. Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO

A lava lake within the Halema`uma`u Overlook vent produced nighttime glow that was visible from the Jaggar Museum overlook and via HVO’s Webcam during the past week. The lava lake rose slowly during the week and reached a level 41 m (135 ft) below the floor of Halema`uma`u as of Wednesday, June 12.

On Kilauea’s East Rift Zone, breakouts from the Peace Day tube remain active at the base of the pali and on the coastal plain. Small ocean entries are active on both sides of the Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park boundary. The Kahauale`a II flow, fed from a spatter cone on the northeast edge of the Pu`u `O`o crater, continues to spread slowly at the edge of the forest north of Pu`u `O`o.

There was one earthquake felt on the Island of Hawai`i in the last week. On Wednesday, June 12, 2013, at 5:12 a.m., HST, there was a magnitude-3.2 earthquake that occurred 11 km (7 mi) southeast of Ho`okena at a depth of 15 km (10 mi).

Visit the HVO Web site (hvo.wr.usgs.gov) for Volcano Awareness Month details and Kilauea, Mauna Loa, and Hualalai activity updates, recent volcano photos, recent earthquakes, and more; call (808) 967-8862 for a Kilauea summary; email questions to askHVO@usgs.gov.

Volcano Watch (hvo.wr.usgs.gov/volcanowatch/) is a weekly article and activity update written by scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey`s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

This photo looks south towards Puʻu ʻŌʻō, where a vent is supplying lava to the Kahaualeʻa II flow, north of the cone on Tuesday (June 11). This slow-moving flow has reached the forest line, producing small scattered brush fires. Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO

This photo looks south towards Puʻu ʻŌʻō, where a vent is supplying lava to the Kahaualeʻa II flow, north of the cone on Tuesday (June 11). This slow-moving flow has reached the forest line, producing small scattered brush fires. Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO

A close-up of the Kahaualeʻa II flow burning vegetation at the forest line, just north of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. The flow consists of numerous slow-moving pāhoehoe lobes. Photo taken on Tuesday (June 11). Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO

A close-up of the Kahaualeʻa II flow burning vegetation at the forest line, just north of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. The flow consists of numerous slow-moving pāhoehoe lobes. Photo taken on Tuesday (June 11). Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO

U.S. Geological Survey map showing the active Peace Day flow, carrying lava southeast to the ocean, and the active Kahaualeʻa 2 flow north of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, as of June 11, 2013. The Kahaualeʻa 2 flow started on May 6 and continues to spread slowly on the lower flank and at the northern base of the Puʻu ʻŌʻō cone. Breakouts near the base of the pali widened the western edge of the Peace Day flow, part of which is in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. Older lava flows are labeled with the years in which they were active. Episodes 1–48b (1983–1986) are shown in gray; episodes 48c–49 (1986–1992) are pale yellow; episodes 50–55 (1992–2007) are tan; and episodes 58–60 (2007–2011) are pale orange. The Peace Day lava tube is shown by the yellow line. The Peace Day tube where it crosses the coastal plain is not obvious and has not been mapped. The contour interval for topographic lines shown on Puʻu ʻŌʻō is 5 m (~16 ft).

U.S. Geological Survey map showing the active Peace Day flow, carrying lava southeast to the ocean, and the active Kahaualeʻa 2 flow north of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, as of June 11, 2013. The Kahaualeʻa 2 flow started on May 6 and continues to spread slowly on the lower flank and at the northern base of the Puʻu ʻŌʻō cone. Breakouts near the base of the pali widened the western edge of the Peace Day flow, part of which is in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. Older lava flows are labeled with the years in which they were active. Episodes 1–48b (1983–1986) are shown in gray; episodes 48c–49 (1986–1992) are pale yellow; episodes 50–55 (1992–2007) are tan; and episodes 58–60 (2007–2011) are pale orange. The Peace Day lava tube is shown by the yellow line. The Peace Day tube where it crosses the coastal plain is not obvious and has not been mapped. The contour interval for topographic lines shown on Puʻu ʻŌʻō is 5 m (~16 ft).

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