Lava continues to flow along the coastal plain this past week

The lava lake in the Overlook vent reached to within 40 m (130 ft) of the Halemaʻumaʻu crater floor before sunrise Thursday morning (Jan 10), before beginning to drop again. The lake level, however, remains high, as can be seen in this photo, looking west. Note the dramatic overhang on the north-northwest side of the vent (to the right). Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO

The lava lake in the Overlook vent reached to within 40 m (130 ft) of the Halemaʻumaʻu crater floor before sunrise Thursday morning (Jan 10), before beginning to drop again. The lake level, however, remains high, as can be seen in this photo, looking west. Note the dramatic overhang on the north-northwest side of the vent (to the right). Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO

From the USGS/HVO Kilauea Update (1/13/2013)

Kilauea continued to erupt at two locations: At the summit, Deflation-Inflation inflation and rising of the lava lake surface continued. At Pu`u `O`o crater, the active lava lake at the northeast edge of the crater floor overflowed several times. To the southeast of Pu`u `O`o, a lava flow was active on the coastal plain and entering the ocean in multiple areas both inside and outside the National Park boundary. Two additional lava flows were active to the west on the coastal plain. Gas emissions remained elevated.

The small lava lake on the northeast side of the Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater floor produced several short flows since the night of Wednesday (January 9). Thursday morning (Jan 10), two separate flows spilled from the Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater and onto the northeast flank of the Puʻu ʻŌʻō cone. The flows are visible at the lower left side of the photo. Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO

The small lava lake on the northeast side of the Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater floor produced several short flows since the night of Wednesday (January 9). Thursday morning (Jan 10), two separate flows spilled from the Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater and onto the northeast flank of the Puʻu ʻŌʻō cone. The flows are visible at the lower left side of the photo. Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO

Zoomed-in view of the lava lake on the northeast side of the Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater floor. Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO

Zoomed-in view of the lava lake on the northeast side of the Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater floor. Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO

A breakout from the active lava tube near the base of the pali in Royal Gardens Wednesday (Jan 9) fed lava onto the coastal plain. This morning, the breakout fed a small ʻaʻā flow, seen in this photo. Several streams of lava from the breakout point are visible in the background. Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO

A breakout from the active lava tube near the base of the pali in Royal Gardens Wednesday (Jan 9) fed lava onto the coastal plain. This morning, the breakout fed a small ʻaʻā flow, seen in this photo. Several streams of lava from the breakout point are visible in the background. Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO

View of the front of the slowly advancing ʻaʻā flow at the base of the pali. Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO

View of the front of the slowly advancing ʻaʻā flow at the base of the pali. Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO

This is a thermal image, looking southwest, showing the active lava flows on the coastal plain. The ocean entry points are to the left, and the breakout near the base of the pali in Royal Gardens is to the right. The active flows near the ocean straddle the National Park boundary (i.e. both inside and outside the Park). Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO

This is a thermal image, looking southwest, showing the active lava flows on the coastal plain. The ocean entry points are to the left, and the breakout near the base of the pali in Royal Gardens is to the right. The active flows near the ocean straddle the National Park boundary (i.e. both inside and outside the Park). Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO

Lava continues to dribble over the sea cliff at the coast, where it produces several weak and variable plumes. This is the eastern of two ocean entry areas, and is outside the National Park. The western area, out of sight to the left in this photo, is within the National Park. Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO

Lava continues to dribble over the sea cliff at the coast, where it produces several weak and variable plumes. This is the eastern of two ocean entry areas, and is outside the National Park. The western area, out of sight to the left in this photo, is within the National Park. Photo courtesy of USGS/HVO

Large-scale map showing the mapped flow expansion on the coastal plain between December 14, 2012, and January 4, 2013 (in bright red). Light red represents the extent of the Peace Day flow from September 21, 2011, to December 14, 2012. Older flows are labeled with the years in which they were active. Changes to the perimeter of the flow farther upslope, from recent flows near the top of Royal Gardens subdivision,were not mapped and so are not shown here.

Large-scale map showing the mapped flow expansion on the coastal plain between December 14, 2012, and January 4, 2013 (in bright red). Light red represents the extent of the Peace Day flow from September 21, 2011, to December 14, 2012. Older flows are labeled with the years in which they were active. Changes to the perimeter of the flow farther upslope, from recent flows near the top of Royal Gardens subdivision,were not mapped and so are not shown here.

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