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Spectacular view of the transit of Venus from Hawaii Island Tuesday (June 5)

A composite of 12 photos showing the transit of Venus across the sun as seen from the Kohala Coast of the Big Island. Photography by Baron Sekiya | Hawaii 24/7

A composite of 12 photos showing the transit of Venus across the sun as seen from the Kohala Coast of the Big Island. Variations in weather are seen with clouds fronting the image of the sun. Photography by Baron Sekiya | Hawaii 24/7

Baron Sekiya and Karin Stanton | Hawaii 24/7

A couple from England made a special trip to Hawaii to view and photograph the transit of Venus. Glenn and Pam started out in Keauhou, moved up to NELHA and finally stopped at the Kiholo Bay scenic lookout for clear skies. The couple later packed everything up and moved again as skies overhead filled with clouds. Photography by Baron Sekiya | Hawaii 24/7

A couple from England made a special trip to Hawaii to view and photograph the transit of Venus. Glenn and Pam started out in Keauhou, moved up to NELHA and finally stopped at the Kiholo Bay scenic lookout for clear skies. The couple later packed everything up and moved again as skies overhead filled with clouds. Photography by Baron Sekiya | Hawaii 24/7

Open skies and brilliant views of the transit of Venus for sky-watchers on the Kohala Coast of the Big Island Tuesday (June 5).

It was hit-or-miss with the cloud cover over the island obscuring the views, but because event played out over more than 6 hours, most people had a chance to see the astronomical wonder that occurs only once every 120 years.

Hawaii, and much of the Pacific, was the only place to watch the entire transit. If you missed it, you are probably out of luck. The next one isn’t due until 2117. You may have better luck catching the May 9, 2016 transit of Mercury but it will happen in the morning darkness in Hawaii so you’ll have to be on the other side of the Earth to view it.

Historically, the transit has been used by scientists to calculate the distance to the sun, determine the size of our Solar System and understand the chemical composition of Venus’ atmosphere.

The last one – in 1874 – saw King Kalakaua welcoming seven astronomers from Great Britain, who set up observation sites on Oahu, Kauai and at Hulihee Palace in Kailua-Kona.

Kalakaua was so impressed with the telescopes, he invited England to establish a permanent observatory in Hawaii. It was built on thePunahou school campus on Oahu.

For more information about the transit and links to the live video feed visit: hawaii247.com/2012/06/04/hawai…

One Response to “Spectacular view of the transit of Venus from Hawaii Island Tuesday (June 5)”

  1. Aanel says:

    Nice photos, Baron! Thanks!

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