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Abercrombie’s chief staffers resign

MEDIA RELEASE

Gov. Neil Abercrombie has announced his Chief of Staff, Amy Asselbaye, and Deputy Chief of Staff, Andrew Aoki, have resigned.

Bruce Coppa, currently the state’s comptroller, has been named the Chief of Staff.

Their resignations will be effective by the end of the month and a transition of leadership is underway.

Asselbaye and Aoki informed Abercrombie earlier this week of their decision to resign in order to spend more time with their families and young children. Asselbaye has three children; Aoki has two young children.

Coppa, the director of the state Department of Accounting and General Services, was head of Coppa Consulting, Inc. before joining the Abercrombie Administration in December 2010.

Prior to that, Coppa served as Chief Operating Officer of Communications Pacific and executive director of Pacific Resource Partnership. Coppa has over 25 years of professional experience in operations and management in Hawaii’s construction industry.

Coppa received his Master’s degree in Business Administration Global Management and Bachelor’s degree in Business Management from the University of Phoenix.

Abercrombie will begin the search for Coppa’s replacement.

Asselbaye has worked for Abercrombie for 18 years, first as a legislative assistant for then-Congressman Abercrombie and was eventually promoted as his Congressional Office’s Chief of Staff.

Aoki has worked with Abercrombie for 2 ½ years, first in the 2010 gubernatorial campaign as the deputy campaign manager before joining the Abercrombie Administration.

“Amy and Andrew and their families have sacrificed for years on behalf of the people of Hawaii and I respect their desires to want to reconnect with their families,” Abercrombie said. “The two of them have helped me make the transition from the campaign to governing. I’m sure the transition to continued leadership in the Governor’s Office will be a smooth one.”

One Response to “Abercrombie’s chief staffers resign”

  1. James says:

    Interesting article, but is someone going to seriously interview the staffers and see why they really left?

    Spending time with family is very important. But, it is also the default reason to leave a position when something quite interesting, and totally unrelated with the family issue, has happened.

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