Categorized | Featured, Multi-sport, Sports

Ironman: More facts, figures and how to stay caught up race day

Karin Stanton | Hawaii 24/7 Editor

If you want to experience Ironman (without actually having to do all that swimming, biking and running), you can just hang out anywhere along Alii Drive in town with about 19,999 other spectators.

Strike up a conversation with the folks next to you. Almost certainly, they will have a great story about why they’ll be standing there in the midday heat and the dark of night for 10, 14, 17 hours.

If you insist on sitting in front of the computer, check out the official Ironman website.

The live 17-hour webcast will let you follow every stroke, spin and stride as you keep one eye on TV to watch the football games.

The site will feature real-time race results, live audio and video updates with former champs Greg Welch and Paula Newby-Fraser, as well as text updates and race photos.

You will need the latest version of Microsoft Silverlight or, if you are using a Mac, the Firefox browser is recommended.

SAVE THE DATE (Dec. 18)

If you have other plans for Saturday, you will have to wait awhile to see what you missed.

NBC will broadcast its Ironman World Championship show at 11 a.m. Hawaii time on Saturday, Dec. 18, with numerous encore broadcasts on the Universal Sports cable network.

The show has earned more than 40 Emmy nominations, won 15 Emmy awards and received three prestigious CINE Golden Eagle Awards.

The 2009 broadcast was recognized in the Sports Emmy Awards categories of “Outstanding Edited Sports Special,” “Outstanding Camera Work” and “Outstanding Editing.”

The event is broadcast to more than 1 million homes each year.

VOLUNTEERS & AID STATIONS

About 5,000 people volunteer their time to staff the aid stations all the bike and run courses. Their primary jobs are to hand out water, food and encouragement.

And have fun doing it. Some camp out at their stations almost all weekend and many spend up to 20 hours on duty race day.

During that time, they’ll hand out 147,600 pounds of ice, 20,000 gallons of cola, water and soup, 21,000 packets of PowerBar Gel, 10,000 PowerBars, 66 cases of bananas, 56 cases of oranges and 1,350 bread rolls.

STATES REPRESENTED — 47 (Extra points if you can figure out the three missing ones before the swim cut off!)

Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, Wisconsin, Wyoming

ATHLETE DEMOGRAPHICS

Average Annual Income: $161,000
Average Age: 37
Gender Ratio: Male: 70 percent; Female: 30 percent
Education (Post Secondary): 95 percent
Occupation (Professional; Executive): 72 percent
Access to Internet: 97 percent
Daily Internet Use: 60 percent

YOUNGEST & OLDEST ATHLETES

The oldest is Lew Hollander, 80, from Bend, Ore. Hollander holds numerous world and age group titles and came in 4th in the 75-79 age group last year. His time was 16:52:29, squeaking in under the 17-hour deadline. This race is his 21st Ironman World Championship.

The youngest competitor is Brandon Perea, 19, of Hilo.

2009 TOTAL STARTERS & FINISHERS

Male Start — 1,288
Male Finish — 1,200 (98.3%)

Female Start — 489
Female Finish — 453 (92.6%)

Total Start — 1,777
Total Finish — 1,653 (93%)

2010 PROS

A total of 121 professionals — 68 men, 53 women

2009 TOP 10 MEN

1. Craig Alexander (AUS) – 8:20:21
2. Chris Lieto (USA) – 8:22:56
3. Andreas Raelert (DEU) – 8:24:23
4. Chris McCormack (AUS) – 8:25:20
5. Rasmus Henning (DNK) – 8:28:17
6. Timo Bracht (DEU) – 8:28:52
7. Dirk Bockel (LUX) – 8:29:55
8. Pete Jacobs (AUS) – 8:30:15
9. Andy Potts (USA) – 8:30:30
10. Faris Al-Sultan (GER) – 8:31:44

2009 TOP 10 WOMEN

1. Chrissie Wellington (GBR) – 8:54:02
2. Mirinda Carfrae (AUS) – 9:13:59
3. Virginia Berasategui (ESP) – 9:15:28
4. Tereza Macel (CZE) – 9:23:43
5. Samantha McGlone (CAN) – 9:30:28
6. Rachel Joyce (GBR) – 9:32:27
7. Joanna Lawn (NZL) – 9:34:45
8. Sandra Wallenhorst (DEU) – 9:38:28
9. Dede Griesbauer (USA) – 9:40:59
10. Tyler Stewart (USA) – 9:42:41

FORMER CHAMPIONS BACK FOR MORE

Men
Craig Alexander — 2008, 2009
Chris McCormack — 2007
Normann Stadler —2004, 2006
Faris Al-Sultan — 2005
Tim DeBoom — 2001, 2002
Tomas Hellriegel — 1997

Women
Chrissie Wellington — 2007, 2008, 2009
Natascha Badmann —1998, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005
Karen Smyers — 1995

COURSE RECORDS

Swim
1998 — Lars Jorgensen (USA) — 46:41
1999 — Jodi Jackson (USA) — 48:43

Bike
2006 — Normann Stadler (GER) — 4:18:23
1993 — Paula Newby-Fraser (ZIM) — 4:48:30

Run
1989 — Mark Allen (USA) — 2:40:04
2009 — Mirinda Carfrae (AUS) — 2:56:51

Course Record
1996 — Luc Van Lierde (BEL) — 8:04:08
2009 — Chrissie Wellington (GBR) — 8:54:02

— Find out more:
www.ironman.com

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