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Guillermo, still a tropical storm, passing far north of the Big Island

20090818_guillermo-track29

TROPICAL STORM GUILLERMO ADVISORY NUMBER 29
NWS CENTRAL PACIFIC HURRICANE CENTER HONOLULU HI EP102009
1100 PM HST TUE AUG 18 2009

…GUILLERMO STILL A TROPICAL STORM FAR TO THE NORTHEAST OF HAWAII…

AT 1100 PM HST…0900 UTC…THE CENTER OF TROPICAL STORM GUILLERMO WAS LOCATED NEAR LATITUDE 29.1 NORTH…LONGITUDE 153.5 WEST OR ABOUT 605 MILES NORTH-NORTHEAST OF HONOLULU HAWAII.

GUILLERMO IS MOVING TOWARD THE NORTHWEST NEAR 18 MPH…AND THIS MOTION IS EXPECTED TO CONTINUE FOR THE NEXT COUPLE OF DAYS. THIS TRACK WILL KEEP GUILLERMO FAR TO THE NORTH OF THE MAIN HAWAIIAN ISLANDS.

MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS ARE NEAR 40 MPH WITH HIGHER GUSTS. SLOW WEAKENING IS EXPECTED OVER THE NEXT COUPLE OF DAYS.

TROPICAL STORM FORCE WINDS EXTEND OUTWARD UP TO 185 MILES TO THE NORTH OF THE CENTER.

ESTIMATED MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE IS 1010 MB…29.83 INCHES.

…SUMMARY OF 1100 PM HST INFORMATION…
LOCATION…29.1N 153.5W
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS…40 MPH
PRESENT MOVEMENT…NORTHWEST OR 310 DEGREES AT 18 MPH
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE…1010 MB

THE NEXT ADVISORY WILL BE ISSUED BY THE CENTRAL PACIFIC HURRICANE CENTER AT 500 AM HST.

Central Pacific Hurricane Center: www.prh.noaa.gov/hnl/cphc

Weather forecasts of all the islands: www.prh.noaa.gov/pr/hnl

Central Pacific Infrared Images

2 Responses to “Guillermo, still a tropical storm, passing far north of the Big Island”

  1. Vijay Naik says:

    It has been difficult to put in the name of storm and find its track, strength and where it is in the pacific in relation to Hawaii where I live. Some of the tracks that appear, show no land on either side, so how is one to know how far it is from me? Also the regional centre in Hawaii will not have much to do with it until it comes under their zone of jurisdiction. Nonsense.

    Can’t you simplify things and give us one single map for the hurricane that includes its location speed and probable track what you see happening with it at that given point in time.

    • Baron says:

      Actually the tracking maps put out by the National Weather Service have strength, speed and forecast track of current tropical cyclones. And if those are close enough to land masses then that it will also indicated on the map.

      The colored full-disc images and excerpt taken from that doesn’t have a distance scale since it wouldn’t make sense with the earth being a sphere and the photograph being flat.

      Ray Tanabe of the Central Pacific Hurricane Center did a great talk on how to track storms using their website. I just added it to the bottom of this post.

      It’s really too bad only a couple of people showed-up to the CPHC workshop when they were in Hilo.

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